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MBThompson502
04-07-2011, 02:08 AM
Hey everyone. I'm completely new to disc golf. I played it once and now I'm addicted. I completely understand its a game of finesse and takes a lot of practice, of which I plan on putting in. I was wanting to know if anyone has any tips that will put me on the right track and give me a firm base from which to advance? Every little bit will help and I appreciate any advice.

Thanx!!

weeman
04-07-2011, 08:22 AM
Welcome to the game. My advice would be to throw lighter weight plastic (less than 170g) and stick to only a couple models, maybe one driver, one mid range, one putter until you feel really confident in each of those discs. You should also check out the local disc golf store, Derby City Disc at 9310 Blue Lick Road in Louisville. Damon, the owner, can point you in the right direction and provide a lot of helpful tips to get started in the right direction. Good luck!

MarcusGresham
04-07-2011, 08:35 AM
Keep your disc as parallel to the ground as possible to get your maximum distance. If you can learn to throw level (and I'm not one to watch to learn how to do it,) you'll start to pick up more ideas from there.

Also, try to play in leagues because you'll get paired with guys who are really good and more than willing to give you pointers when they watch you.

Adam
04-07-2011, 08:53 AM
Sounds like you caught the disc golf bug pretty bad. Weeman had excellent advice about disc selection and that's a really important tip. There's hundreds of discs to choose from for a wide range of skill levels, but new players go out and buy lots of discs thinking a disc will make them a better players when that's not the case.

Here's a link (http://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums/showthread.php?t=26165) with lots of technique related articles and videos. That's probably the best place to start.

Good luck and I hope to see you on the course!

captain plastic
04-07-2011, 09:07 AM
Enjoy yourself mostly.
Come out to leagues. Get some
of your close friends playing. As far
as disc go. I suggest these three
Stingray, Roc, Aviar

Kao
04-07-2011, 11:43 AM
I would stay away from the wide rimmed drivers because they can create alot of problems for newer players. I like to start people off with a mid and a putter then add drivers. What are you throwing now and how far is it going?


The link Adam posted is good but I prefer to go directly to http://www.discgolfreview.com/index.html (and the forums) for the info. There are some people at DGCR who know their stuff but there are more who give bad advice to beginners. I know most of those links go back to DGR but I would just start there to avoid any confusion.


Visit Damons shop as mentioned so you can get the feel for different disc. Putters will be the most important part of your game so try them out when you get there.


I will also say come to as many league nights and club functions so you can meet other people. Watching others throw will open your eyes to so many options. I was nervious at first when I was new but the Ville has a great dg atmosphere and there are alot of people willing to help you learn.


Start with baseline plastic in lighter weights like Wyatt said. Disc selections I like below:

Mid = Comet, Buzzz, or Roc
Putter = Any Gateway, Aviar, or Magnet
Driver = Leopard and Gazelle (add at later date depending on progression)

Daniel
04-07-2011, 04:06 PM
Please, whatever you do, do not go for the "fastest" driver on the market. (Ie/Boss, Vulcan, etc) You need, like Kao said, to throw something like a Leopard (what I started with) that you can learn on and *then* move up. The faster stuff is for guys that have great form and speed in their throws. No matter who you are, starting out you just don't have it. Maybe 1/1,000,000 but that's about it...

jamesmcc
04-07-2011, 11:52 PM
The best way to get practical tips and tips you can see 1st hand is to come out to leagues where there is Pro/Am doubles these leagues were set up for this reason many pros have no problem giving advise on discs and technique.

MBThompson502
04-08-2011, 03:11 AM
Thanks Kao. Right now I'm just using the starter set from Meijers lol. I figure I learn the basics such as my form before I start throwing down a lot of money on discs. However I will pick up a couple of those you mentioned. I heard from others also that those are good starter discs. Thanks for the info. I will head out to some leagues and watch. Thanks again!

MBThompson502
04-08-2011, 03:12 AM
Thanks Daniel. I figured the same. No need to spend a lot of money on something I have no experience throwing lol.

MBThompson502
04-08-2011, 03:13 AM
Thats a good idea James. Where do I go to find league info?

Judge
04-08-2011, 07:53 AM
it is on here under weekly league events but we have tuesday @ seviren lang in georgetown, wednesday at Iroqouis, and thursday @ Charlie Vettiner all start @ 6

ripIT
04-08-2011, 09:44 PM
Go to a big field and learn what your disc do. This helps me alot. And watch and talk to pros as much as poss.......

swasafix
04-09-2011, 03:04 AM
As a beginner myself I can tell you they are right about the leopard. It is a great one to start with, mine is 170g, it is also easy on the wallet :)
I love the Rocs for midrange, I had a Wolf (thanks to Daniel) it worked out good for me....but now somebody else has it sense it was lost at IQ and never returned :(
Also I had a Valkyrie (which lost same way as the wolf) but it was a good driver for me also. It is easy on the wallet as well for around ten bucks.

MBThompson502
04-09-2011, 05:20 AM
Thanks every one. You all are the reason I caught, as Adam said, the disc golf bug. The show of support is amazing. Thank you all again and I'm going to get crackin on everything you all said. Adam, thanks for that link. Its really going to help and I'm positive I'll be referencing it quite regularly. Hope to see you all out there sometime.

Daniel
04-09-2011, 09:50 AM
If you want to get better fast, practice certain shots (hyzers, anhyzers, straight, rollers, etc), not certain holes. Don't play rounds but just go and practice. That way you'll learn your discs as others have said and you'll know what your body does. Both very important things.

One thing that worked for me in getting my distance waaaaaaay up (to a max of 550') was to perfect "Feldberg's Towel Tip". It's basically using your driving form to snap a towel (as if you're playing with your wife or little woman). If you can do it, you will be driving very well. (Granted, you may not be up to this yet but use it when you are.) Just search youtube or the net for it and you'll find a bunch about it. I've been on several different boards talking about it over the past year or so. Good stuff.

Wish I could get out and play but medical crap has me on the fritz (for now, but I'm determined). I'll see you out there sometime!

MarcusGresham
04-09-2011, 09:57 AM
Totally agree about the Wolf---one of the easiest discs to throw in my opinion. I also like a Mako because it stays straight.

Daniel
04-09-2011, 12:36 PM
Also, if you're working on your form, throw a comet (and throw it hard). If your form is off or bad, it will turn and burn. If it's good, you can keep them straight for a loooong way. I've seen them and thrown them over 420'. It's a great tool for form help.

festis
04-09-2011, 01:58 PM
The best advice for new players: Lightweight, understable discs. Sidewinder, Roadrunner, Vision, Stratus, and yes the Vulcan. The Vulcan was designed for lower armspeed players and many of my customer of all skill levels love that disc. It has been best described as a "sidewinder on steroids". But the rest of high speed discs yeah stay away from them for a while. That would be the boss, xcal, destroyer, and everything else on the left side of the chart.

Daniel
04-09-2011, 04:16 PM
Problem with the vulcan is that you still need the high speed that beginners don't have to get it to perform the way it should. Otherwise, it's just going to go out and dive bomb left. I can see a roadrunner (even thought it's still a fairly high speed driver at a 9 or 10) but I still maintain a Leopard is the best.

I have said for quite a while that once anyone (even pros) can throw a TeeBird over 400', then they have the form to throw the higher speed discs. Until that point, they should stay away from anything faster than TeeBirds. Throwing a TB over 400' is no easy task. It takes very good form. Older players (like DG) relied on good form vs technology to get distance. Just ask Steve Simpson who set a distance record with something like an Aviar at 360'+. That's quite a throw...

MarcusGresham
04-09-2011, 08:05 PM
OK, then diagnose me, Daniel (seriously, for once I'm actually being serious.) Is it because I throw sidearm instead of backhand, because I don't have great arm speed at all, but I can throw a Boss and I can't get much of anything out of a Leopard (although I can throw it farther backhand than my other drivers,) and couldn't ever do anything with a Sidewinder but roll it. I also got a Vulcan yesterday and seemed as if I could throw it with what felt like far less effort than my Boss or Raging Inferno (which are my main drivers,) and had one even with the basket on #18 at Brandenburg.

Daniel
04-09-2011, 10:36 PM
OK, then diagnose me, Daniel (seriously, for once I'm actually being serious.) Is it because I throw sidearm instead of backhand, because I don't have great arm speed at all, but I can throw a Boss and I can't get much of anything out of a Leopard (although I can throw it farther backhand than my other drivers,) and couldn't ever do anything with a Sidewinder but roll it. I also got a Vulcan yesterday and seemed as if I could throw it with what felt like far less effort than my Boss or Raging Inferno (which are my main drivers,) and had one even with the basket on #18 at Brandenburg.

It's very difficult to throw understable drivers (like a Leopard) FH. The same thing applies to FH as BH to what I said above about the Comet. It's all about form. Most people use higher speed discs as a "crutch" when throwing FH. That's why you see most people throw firebirds or other overstable drivers when throwing FH because they're resistant to turning and burning.

The main thing to try and do when throwing FH is to use your wrist as a spring. When you start to accelerate your arm forward, you should feel the weight of the disc against your fingers and that weight should then bend your wrist (as a spring) back. Once the disc is at the point of launch, the wrist will "spring" back and launch the disc (by you tightening the muscles in your forearm, causing the wrist to "spring" back). The smoother you can be, the more you are going to be able to throw more understable plastic.

I was messing around in my back yard and felt this with my putters and could throw my putters FH well over 200' dead straight and no turn either way FH. (It's much easier to feel on deeper rimmed discs, like putters.) I assume you know Martin Y? Watch is FH. He is an ultimate player and has a very smooth FH. You'll get a lot from watching his form. He's good.

If you want, I can certainly meet up sometime in a field or even at the course and show you what I'm talking about. It's much easier (at least for me) to see it vs reading about it. I have thrown a lot of FH for years. I was maxing out at about 425' last year with my FH. Just let me know.

MarcusGresham
04-10-2011, 12:36 AM
OK, makes sense---I guess just have to avoid understable drivers. I do use the "spring" type motion; I guess it just goes back to me never even having that great of arm speed in baseball.

Daniel
04-10-2011, 11:05 AM
OK, makes sense---I guess just have to avoid understable drivers. I do use the "spring" type motion; I guess it just goes back to me never even having that great of arm speed in baseball.

No, don't avoid understable drivers! Learn to throw them! Focus on your technique. No offense, but I doubt you're fully getting the effect of the spring if you can't throw understable plastic. (Know that the more spin you put on a disc, the LESS understable it will fly. In other words, if you put a ton of spin (vs speed) on a roller disc, it will fly straight vs turning over.) A way to learn is to practice throwing FH with your putters or mids. Don't give up but keep on trying until you can get them to release smoothly (no flutter) and they don't turn to the right. It will take time and it will be frustrating but that's the only way to improve your technique. I got so freaking frustrated when I was learning, it wasn't even funny.

Again, if you'd like to meet up at CV sometime, I can certainly do that. I don't mind teaching at all.

There are some good videos of good technique on www.discgolfreview.com. Just do some searching and you'll find it. Blake Taukkanen, the site owner, is a very good teacher. I learned quite a bit about form from him.

G1nked
04-10-2011, 10:06 PM
forget the videos meet up with Daniel this guy is a great mentor and I would jump all over that if I had a chance

ripIT
04-11-2011, 12:44 AM
2nd that one..

JohnnyNoPants
05-16-2011, 05:46 PM
Just a word of advice from one newbie to another. I started playing in Feb this year after some of my friends invited me out to IQ one Saturday. Like you, I was HOOKED!!! I went out and bought a 169g Roadrunner, 175g Cro and a 175g Aviar. At the time, I bought them because I was told they were beginner friendly, at least according to the guy at PIAS; and I liked the colors they came in. At the time, I had no clue about Derby City Discs, which is where I get all my DG stuff now!

The biggest help I have gotten is by asking questions, and welcoming any and all advice that someone may give me. Not all advice will work for you, and not all techniques will be best suited for the way you throw. Practice, Practice, Practice!

I have played in 2 tournaments so far, and have gained some great new friends, as well as a better understanding of the game. I do suggest you hit leagues, if only for the opportunity to be critiqued by our local pros. It will help your game tremendously.